ActiveMath® Workshop Schedule


REGISTRATION FEE:

$195 for one workshop; $180 each when two or more registrations are received at the same time. Registration fee includes extensive coursebook with blacklines, complimentary snacks, and more. Lunch is included where indicated.

Call us for special reduced group rates for workshops.
(847) 883-8864


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Fall 2015 Workshops

Workshop #257Teaching Students the Way They Learn
Using Real-World Applications and Hands-on Activities, Grades 4–8

Workshop #258:
Strategies for Teaching Fractions



Fall 2015 Workshops

Workshop #257: Teaching Students the Way They Learn
Using Real-World Applications and Hands-on Activities, Grades 4–8

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

How many times have we heard, “When am I ever going to use this?” This workshop uses motivating activities, interesting puzzles, and real-world data to help students better understand and see the relevance of school math, while addressing key mathematical skills and concepts related to the national mathematics standards. Connections will be made between mathematics and science, social studies, literature, and art by using real-world applications that focus on a variety of learning styles. Students engaged in these activities will begin to see that “math is everywhere”— it is a way of thinking, solving problems, and is a significant part of their real world.

Topics

  • A Brief Overview of Selected Cognitive Learning Theories: Academic research on Multiple Intelligences and Realistic Mathematics Education (Math in the Real World) will form the foundation of the activities, puzzles, and games used in this workshop.
  • Differentiated Instruction in the Mathematics Classroom: Understanding the philosophy that “One size doesn’t fit all” we will investigate hands-on activities that focus on students’ prior knowledge and alternative teaching strategies. Working in groups of four students will use “Brush Up Those Skills” to review newly-learned math skills and concepts related to rational numbers.
  • Realistic Mathematics Education: Math in the Real World: We will explore connections between school math and real-world math using weather phenomena, recipe conversions, unit cost and percentage of profit, data collection to find heart rates, and poetry to explore mathematical combinations.
  • Collaborative Learning to Promote Problem Solving: Students working in small groups help one another “persevere” and become better problem-solvers. Participants will work collaboratively to learn, first hand, how mathematics discussion and collaboration can help their students become better problem-solvers. Get It Together: Math Problems for Groups (Ericson, T., 1989) will be used.
  • Experience Howard Gardner’s Multiple Intelligence as a Means to Meet the Needs of All Students: Learn how to teach traditional mathematics topics using activities that employ Gardner’s theory of Multiple Intelligences. The focus will be on Number and Operations Algebra, Geometry and Measurement.
  • Use Educational Games and Puzzles to Review and Revisit Skills and Concepts: Instructional games and self-correcting puzzles will be used to revisit skills and concepts, promote a positive attitude towards mathematics, encourage collaboration, allow students to utilize their own learning styles, and encourage youngsters to work independently. A variety of math concepts will be addressed, including algebra, fractions, decimals, and percent.
  • Seamlessly Integrate Alternative, Non-traditional Assessment: Give your students the means to display knowledge in many different ways and allow those students who are not skilled test takers to demonstrate what they have learned. Using the hands-on activities and games presented in this workshop, we will investigate how to use warm-ups, journals, presentations, and projects to assess students in your math classroom.

All teachers, including those teaching developmental curricula or math education teachers, should benefit from this workshop.

Dates: November 7, 2015
Registration: 8:00 am
Workshop hours:
Saturday 8:00 am – 4:00 pm

NEW Location:

The Continental Restaurant and Banquet
788 Buffalo Grove Road
Buffalo Grove, IL 60089
Phone: 847/459-9095

Facilitator:
Hope Martin

Hope Martin is a State Finalist for the Presidential Award for Excellence in Mathematics and Science.

Hope has been a mathematics educator for 40+ years—including close to 30 years in the classroom. Currently she is adjunct to National-Louis University. She is a frequent presenter at local and national conferences.

Hope has authored numerous math books for teachers and students including Differentiated Instruction in Mathematics: Instructions and Activities for the Diverse Classroom and Active Learning in the Mathematics Classroom.

Registration Fee:

  • The cost for one workshop: $195.
  • Two or more registrations received at the same time: Only $180 each.

THIS WORKSHOP INCLUDES:

  • An extensive coursebook with blacklines to take directly back into your classroom
  • A copy of Hope’s book, Active Learning in the Mathematics Classroom—a $35.95 value!
    Active Learning
  • A complimentary continental breakfast
    and a delicious lunch
  • A certificate of participation suitable for framing and a fascinating puzzle

There will be an opportunity to examine and purchase supplemental math materials. Bring your school Tax ID to the workshop.

One hour of graduate level professional development credit, for an additional $65 fee paid at the workshop, available through
Brandman University Extended Education – EDDU 9437
A reflection paper is required for graduate level professional development.

CPDU Provider: National-Louis University — 7 Illinois CPDUs are available for this workshop
No outside assignments required to receive CPDUs.

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Workshop #258Strategies for Teaching Fractions

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

No matter how you slice it, fractions are foundational. This workshop engages participants in instructional strategies that promote deep student understanding of fraction concepts and operations addressed by the Common Core State Standards. Each topic is aligned to specific Standards for Mathematical Content. A package of guiding questions will be provided to help teachers engage their students with each of the Standards for Mathematical Practice.

A comprehensive collection of student error patterns will be examined. Participants explore why students may make those errors. Participants learn how to use error patterns to inform instruction, pinpoint intervention, and stimulate student thinking. The workshop addresses the use of estimation, alternative algorithms, instructional games, hands-on activities, and guided discovery lessons. The strategies support instruction of both regular and special-needs students.

Topics

  • Overview of Academic Research: We will examine academic research on these topics: Accessing language for English learners, Error analysis, Multiple representations, Teaching estimation strategies prior to formal instruction on algorithms, Alternative algorithms, Differentiating instruction, and Instructional games to provide practice and reinforcement.
  • Big Ideas in Fraction Concepts and Computation: Explore ways to teach the big ideas about fractions: What is a fraction? How can they be represented? How do benchmarks facilitate estimation? How can you compare fractions without finding a common denominator?
  • Multiple Representations: Models for part-whole (circle and length), parts of a collection (sets), location on a number line, and symbolic will all be applied. An emphasis will be placed on student engagement with number lines as prescribed by the CCSS.
  • Guided Discovery Lessons: Engage in lessons promoting the discovery of computational algorithms: Making Sum Difference Using Strips (addition / subtraction), It’s in the Fold (paperfolding for multiplication), and How Many Strips Will Fit? (using a ruler for division). Learn how to help students make the transition from the models to paper-pencil algorithms.
  • Big Ideas in Problem Solving: Key actions and problem structures will be examined for each of the operations to provide insight as to why a particular operation is appropriate to use to solve a given problem. Participants will write and share their own word problems for given actions and problem structures.
  • A Model of Diagnosis, Item Analysis, and Intervention: Diagnostic tests for fraction concepts and operations will be examined. The importance of using item analysis to pinpoint student weaknesses as a way to form a basis for meaningful step-by-step interventions will be explored. The interventions are based on an instructional model of starting with a tactile, hands-on representation, moving to the use of drawings, and finally moving to a symbolic algorithm (Concrete → Semi-concrete → Abstract).
  • Guiding Questions and the Standards for Mathematical Practice: With each activity in the workshop, explore how you can raise the level of discourse by employing Guiding Questions based on the eight Standards for Mathematical Practice in the CCSS.
  • Instructional Games and Activities: Engage in exciting activities and games such as Equivalent Fractions Cover-All, Fractions on My Plate, More or Less on a Number Line, Balance the Number Sentence, and Rolling a-Plot of Fractions (a game that integrates fractions and statistics).
  • Editor Error Search: Students find and correct errors that appear in specially prepared lessons that are full of mathematical and grammatical errors. This is an excellent way for students to review concepts: In order to correct the errors, students must understand the concepts.
  • PARCC Assessment: Examine sample PARCC Assessment items related to fractions.

All teachers, including those teaching developmental curricula or math education teachers, should benefit from this workshop.

Date: November 14, 2015
Registration: 8:00 am
Workshop hours:
Saturday 8:00 am – 4:00 pm

NEW Location:

The Continental Restaurant and Banquet
788 Buffalo Grove Road
Buffalo Grove, IL 60089
Phone: 847/459-9095

Facilitator:
David B. Spangler

Recipient of the 2014 ICTM
Lee Yunker Mathematics
Leadership Award
(Illinois Council of Teachers of Mathematics)

David has been a mathematics educator for 40 years. He is a frequent presenter at conferences and is a developer of mathematics curriculum materials for K–12.

David has authored a number of math books for teachers and students, including Math for Real Kids, and is co-editor of NCTM’s Cartoon Corner in Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School.

Registration Fee:

  • The cost for one workshop: $195.
  • Two or more registrations received at the same time: Only $180 each.

THIS WORKSHOP INCLUDES:

  • An extensive coursebook with blacklines to take directly back into your classroom
  • A copy of David’s book, Strategies for Teaching Fractions—a $35.95 value!
  • A complimentary continental breakfast and a delicious lunch
  • A certificate of participation suitable for framing and a fascinating puzzle

There will be an opportunity to examine and purchase supplemental math materials. Bring your school Tax ID to the workshop.

One hour of graduate level professional development credit, for an additional $65 fee paid at the workshop, available through
Brandman University Extended Education – EDDU 9046
A reflection paper is required for graduate level professional development.

CPDU Provider: National-Louis University — 7 Illinois CPDUs are available for this workshop
No outside assignments required to receive CPDUs.

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Go to Registration Page

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