ActiveMath® Workshop Schedule


REGISTRATION FEE:

$195 for one workshop; $180 each when two or more registrations are received at the same time. Registration fee includes extensive coursebook with blacklines, complimentary snacks, and more. Lunch is included where indicated.

Call us for special reduced group rates for workshops.
(847) 722–8690


Click on a workshop for more information


Summer 2016 Workshops

Workshop #259::
Teaching Probability for the Real World, Grades 6–10

Workshop #260:
Teaching Statistics for the Real World, Grades 6–10



Summer 2016 Workshops

Workshop #259: Teaching Probability for the Real World, Grades 6–10

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

This workshop is designed to take the fear out of learning probability—while providing instructional strategies designed to help your students become critical consumers of everyday probability. Participants are engaged in hands-on activities and experiments based on real-world situations from surveys, medicine, genetics, game shows, gaming, geography, insurance, sports, weather forecasting, and more.

Instructional strategies are employed that promote deep student understanding of probability concepts and skills addressed by the Common Core State Standards. The strategies support instruction of both regular and special-needs students. No prior probability knowledge is assumed.

Topics

  • Survey the Academic Research: Examine the academic research on the teaching of probability. An extensive bibliography of probability and statistics resources will be provided.
  • Spin into Probability: Participate in hands-on activities designed to develop an introduction and conceptual base for both theoretical and experimental probabilities.
  • Take the Uncertainty out of Finding Time to Teach Probability: Is Probability the final chapter in your book? Does it appear anywhere in your book? To ensure coverage of probability, learn instructional strategies on how to integrate probability into your lessons on fractions, decimals, percent, proportions, geometry, and measurement.
  • Use Probability to Make Real-world Predictions: Conduct a simulation that explores predictions associated with Hurricane Katrina; assess actuarial risk predictions; and analyze a game of chance to see if it is fair.
  • “Venn” Do You Use Venn Diagrams? Learn how to organize results from a survey in a Venn diagram to aid in solving probability problems involving overlapping events.
  • Learn the Connections Between Odds and Probability: Participate in an activity to test how long your “species” can beat the odds for becoming extinct. Are you afraid to roll the dice to find out?
  • Going Global with Geometric Probability: Run an experiment to predict the probability that a meteor landing on Earth will land on water.
  • What Do You Expect? Explore real-world situations, such as those in contests and gaming, where choices are made based on mathematical expectation.
  • Solve “Classic” Probability Problems: Learn the mathematics behind “The Birthday Problem” and probability problems posed by Marilyn vos Savant in her syndicated column.
  • Set Up Fair Models and Conduct Exciting Probability Simulations and Experiments: What are your chances of passing a true-false or multiple-choice test when you guess at all the answers? Estimate your chances of stepping on a sidewalk crack in a concrete way. Take your chances with Monte Hall's “Let's Make a Deal”: Are you better off sticking with your door—or switching? Try a small-scale hands-on simulation; then do a large-scale computerized simulation to confirm your results.
  • Using Guiding Questions and the Standards for Mathematical Practice: With each activity in the workshop, explore how you can raise the level of discourse by employing Guiding Questions based on the eight Standards for Mathematical Practice in the CCSS.
  • Cartoon Corner: Take home a collection of probability-related comics with associated probability problems for your students to explore and enjoy.

All teachers, including those teaching developmental curricula or math education teachers, should benefit from this workshop.

Dates: July 8, 2016
Registration: 8:00 am
Workshop hours:
Friday 8:30 am – 4:30 pm

Location:

The Continental Restaurant and Banquet
788 Buffalo Grove Road
Buffalo Grove, IL 60089
Phone: 847/459-4095

Facilitator:
David B. Spangler

Recipient of the 2014 ICTM
Lee Yunker Mathematics
Leadership Award
(Illinois Council of Teachers of Mathematics)

David has been a mathematics educator for 40+ years. He is a frequent facilitator at conferences and is a developer of mathematics curriculum materials for grades K–12.

David has authored a number of math books for teachers and students, including Math for Real Kids, and Strategies for Teaching Fractions. He is co-editor of NCTM’s Cartoon Corner in Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School.

Registration Fee:

  • The cost for one workshop: $195.
  • Two or more registrations received at the same time: Only $180 each.

THIS WORKSHOP INCLUDES:

  • An extensive coursebook with blacklines to take directly back into your classroom
  • A copy of David’s book, Mathematics Explorations: Detective-style Activities for the Real World—a $29.95 value!
    Active Learning
  • A complimentary continental breakfast
    and a delicious lunch
  • A certificate of participation suitable for framing and a fascinating puzzle

There will be an opportunity to examine and purchase supplemental math materials. Bring your school Tax ID to the workshop.

One hour of graduate level professional development credit, for an additional $65 fee paid at the workshop, available through
Brandman University Extended Education – Course Number: EDDU 9446
A reflection paper is required for graduate level professional development.

CPDU Provider: National-Louis University — 7 Illinois CPDUs are available for this workshop
No outside assignments required to receive CPDUs.

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Workshop #260: Teaching Statistics for the Real World, Grades 6–10

PROGRAM HIGHLIGHTS

This workshop is designed to provide instructional strategies to help your students become critical consumers of everyday statistics. Participants will explore statistics in the world around them—in surveys, in school grades, in news reports, in sports, in business applications, and more!

The course will focus on the entire data collection process, including the collection, organization, analysis, and graphic representation of data. Instructional strategies are employed that promote deep student understanding of statistics concepts and skills addressed by the Common Core State Standards. The strategies support instruction of both regular and special-needs students.

Topics

  • Survey the Academic Research: Examine the academic research on the teaching of statistics. An extensive bibliography of probability and statistics resources will be provided.
  • Participate in Exciting "Daily Data" Surveys: Discover how you can begin your classes with a brief survey question—and use the results to make predictions. Then see how the analysis of the results can be used as a springboard into your regular math lessons!
  • These Are Not Your Average Lessons: There is so much more to the concepts of mean, median, and mode than simply cranking out formulas. Explore the advantages and disadvantages of using each—in a meaningful way. What does the mean mean? How does a 0 affect your average? How many points do you need to earn on the next test to raise your average to an A?
  • Explore Statistics in Cryptology: In the activity “Mode Code,” you will break a code applying the concept of mode.
  • There’s Variability in Every Process: Explore real-world applications involving the concepts of range, interquartile range, mean absolute deviation, and standard deviation.
  • What’s Inside a Bag of m&m’s? Engage in a data-collection activity where you examine the contents of a bag of m&m’s, collect and analyze class data, and then make predictions about the contents of an unopened bag. This activity bridges the two main branches of statistics: descriptive and inferential.
  • Examine the Misuse of Statistics: Discuss actual newspaper ads and graphs that are intended to mislead the unknowing consumer.
  • A Sample of Sampling: Compare and contrast sampling techniques, including random, stratified, and systematic sampling (nth-element).
  • Investigate Graphical Representations: Represent real-world data using bar, line, and circle graphs; stem-and-leaf displays; and box-and-whisker plots—and decide which graph is most effective for a given situation.
  • Engage in a Problem-based Investigation to Recommend if the CrashSmasher Automobile Is Safe: Working in small teams, analyze data, create graphical representations, and make a recommendation to the “board of directors” if this car is safe for mass production.
  • What’s Trending? Collect real-world data, make a scatter plot, draw a line of best fit (trend line), write an equation for the line, and analyze residual values.
  • Using Guiding Questions and the Standards for Mathematical Practice: With each activity in the workshop, explore how you can raise the level of discourse by employing Guiding Questions based on the eight Standards for Mathematical Practice in the CCSS.
  • “Statistical thinking will one day be as necessary for efficient citizenship as the ability to read and write.” —H.G. Wells (1866–1946): This quote is the guiding light for all of the activities in this workshop.

All teachers, including those teaching developmental curricula or math education teachers, should benefit from this workshop.

Dates: July 9, 2016
Registration: 8:00 am
Workshop hours:
Friday 8:30 am – 4:30 pm

Location:

The Continental Restaurant and Banquet
788 Buffalo Grove Road
Buffalo Grove, IL 60089
Phone: 847/459-4095

Facilitator:
David B. Spangler

Recipient of the 2014 ICTM
Lee Yunker Mathematics
Leadership Award
(Illinois Council of Teachers of Mathematics)

David has been a mathematics educator for 40+ years. He is a frequent facilitator at conferences and is a developer of mathematics curriculum materials for grades K–12.

David has authored a number of math books for teachers and students, including Math for Real Kids, and Strategies for Teaching Fractions. He is co-editor of NCTM’s Cartoon Corner in Mathematics Teaching in the Middle School.

Registration Fee:

  • The cost for one workshop: $195.
  • Two or more registrations received at the same time: Only $180 each.

THIS WORKSHOP INCLUDES:

  • An extensive coursebook with blacklines to take directly back into your classroom
  • A copy of David’s book, Math for Real Kids: Common Core Problems, Applications, and Activities for Grades 4–7—a $24.95 value!
    Active Learning
  • A complimentary continental breakfast
    and a delicious lunch
  • A certificate of participation suitable for framing and a fascinating puzzle

There will be an opportunity to examine and purchase supplemental math materials. Bring your school Tax ID to the workshop.

One hour of graduate level professional development credit, for an additional $65 fee paid at the workshop, available through
Brandman University Extended Education – Course Number: EDDU 9445
A reflection paper is required for graduate level professional development.

CPDU Provider: National-Louis University — 7 Illinois CPDUs are available for this workshop
No outside assignments required to receive CPDUs.

back to top

Go to Registration Page

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